• Water pollution in central Jakarta, Indonesia.
  • Water pollution in central Jakarta, Indonesia.
  • Water pollution in central Jakarta, Indonesia.
  • Water pollution in central Jakarta, Indonesia.
  • Water pollution in central Jakarta, Indonesia.
  • Water pollution in central Jakarta, Indonesia.
  • Water pollution in central Jakarta, Indonesia.
  • A man delivers water in a slum community that is sourced from groundwater aquifers under the city. The water is sold to local residents throughout the city who use it for cooking and cleaning. Clean water is at a premium in Jakarta resulting in Jakartans paying nearly 25% of their income just for usable water.
  • A young girl covers herself from falling water at Ancol Water Park in northern Jakarta.<br />
<br />
To license this image, please contact the National Geographic Creative Collection:<br />
<br />
Image ID:   1574990<br />
 <br />
Email: natgeocreative@ngs.org<br />
<br />
Telephone: 202 857 7537 / Toll Free 800 434 2244<br />
<br />
National Geographic Creative<br />
1145 17th St NW, Washington DC 20036
  • A boy jumps over a water channel on local farmland near Kanpur. Local water channels are laced with toxins, released from the nearby leather-producing tanneries. The water goes directly onto farmland, feeding into the local food chain, resulting in serious health problems for many locals.
  • Children run through the shallows of the Ganges River. Waste water in the foreground from nearby tanneries has contributed to the severe degradation of local water resources near the city of Kanpur. The city is notorious for having some of the country's worst water pollution which is created by the local leathery tannery industry.
  • A young woman jumps over a waste water channel from a nearby leather-producing tannery. The water is laced with toxins from the leather treatment process and is discarded directly into water channels that run through the city.
  • A sign warning people of the dangers of getting to close to the water, at Qinghai Lake. Qinghai Lake, China's largest inland body of water lies at over 3000m on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. The lake has been shrinking in recent decades, as a result of increased water-usage for local agriculture. Qinghai Province. China. 2010
  • A child wades through the shallows of the Ganges River. Waste water in the foreground from nearby tanneries has contributed to the severe degradation of local water resources near the city of Kanpur. The city is notorious for having some of the country's worst water pollution which is created by the local leathery tannery industry.
  • A small pool of red water sits in a footprint in near a waste water channel in the town of Kanpur, in northern India. The water is laced with toxins and is highly acidic, giving it its distinct colour. The city is notorious for having some of the country's worst water pollution which is created by the local leathery tannery industry.
  • Water rushes through the Dujiangyan Irrigation System. The system is regarded as an "ancient Chinese engineering marvel." By naturally channeling water from the Min River during times of flood, the irrigation system served to protect the local area from flooding and provide water to the Chengdu basin. Sichuan Province. 2010
  • Women fill water bottles next to a polluted lake near the wetlands outside of Kolkata.<br />
<br />
To license this image, please contact the National Geographic Creative Collection:<br />
<br />
Image ID: 1925806 <br />
 <br />
Email: natgeocreative@ngs.org<br />
<br />
Telephone: 202 857 7537 / Toll Free 800 434 2244<br />
<br />
National Geographic Creative<br />
1145 17th St NW, Washington DC 20036
  • Waste water from tanneries is channeled onto nearby farmland in the Indian city of Kanpur. The city is notorious for having some of the country's worst water pollution which is created by the local leathery tannery industry. Waste water laced with toxins, such as chromium, is discharged in local waterways and agricultural land which is used many residents who live in the nearby area. An array of health problems now afflict locals who have worked in the tanneries, or use the local water. Health effects have included cancers, mental health problems, child development issues and skin diseases.
  • Waste water from tanneries is channeled onto nearby farmland in the Indian city of Kanpur. The city is notorious for having some of the country's worst water pollution which is created by the local leathery tannery industry. Waste water laced with toxins, such as chromium, is discharged in local waterways and agricultural land which is used many residents who live in the nearby area. An array of health problems now afflict locals who have worked in the tanneries, or use the local water. Health effects have included cancers, mental health problems, child development issues and skin diseases.
  • Men carry carts full of water that is sourced from groundwater aquifers under the city. The water is sold to local residents throughout the city who use it for cooking and cleaning. Clean water is at a premium in Jakarta resulting in Jakartans paying nearly 25% of their income just for usable water.
  • A pond in a community in central Jakarta, suffering from severe eutrophication, the process by which excess algae grows on the surface of the water as a result of excess nitrates in the water.
  • People enjoy Ancol Water Park in northern Jakarta.<br />
<br />
To license this image, please contact the National Geographic Creative Collection:<br />
<br />
Image ID:  1574991<br />
 <br />
Email: natgeocreative@ngs.org<br />
<br />
Telephone: 202 857 7537 / Toll Free 800 434 2244<br />
<br />
National Geographic Creative<br />
1145 17th St NW, Washington DC 20036
  • A man crosses one of the main channels that makes up the Dujiangyan Irrigation System. The system is regarded as an "ancient Chinese engineering marvel." By naturally channeling water from the Min River during times of flood, the irrigation system served to protect the local area from flooding and provide water to the Chengdu basin. Sichuan Province. 2010
  • Members of the public look on as flood waters increase in the Dujiangyan Irrigation System. The system is regarded as an "ancient Chinese engineering marvel." By naturally channeling water from the Min River during times of flood, the irrigation system served to protect the local area from flooding and provide water to the Chengdu basin. Sichuan Province. 2010
View: 24 | 500
Prev Next