• A dead fish on the shores of a beach in Funafuti. According to RNZ News in 2018, "The European Union has lifted a so-called "yellow card" it had given Tuvalu over its fisheries management. The lifting comes following improvements Tuvalu's made to fight illegal fishing. Tuvalu was issued the yellow card in December 2014, at risk of being considered a "non-cooperating country." Fish caught by vessels operating in these countries can't be imported into the EU. The European Commission said it recognised Tuvalu's progress in addressing shortcomings in its fisheries governance. It said the EU had been able to help Tuvalu combat illegal fishing through a range of measures. " Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Waves from the Pacific Ocean (left) crash onto shore in Funafuti, Tuvalu. Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Cameron Isala, 25, a fisherman, stands near the shoreline in central Funafuti, the capital of the small Pacific nation of Tuvalu. Land poor micro-states in the region are some of the most vulnerable to climate change impacts. This has driven many to flee their homelands, in fear of the potential environmental catastophes their countries are vulnerable to, and also in search of higher incomes through better job opportunities provided by other larger countries. It is estimated nearly 20% of Tuvalu's population have left and reside in other countries such as New Zealand and Australia. Young adults are the most likely to leave, with the older generation most likely to stay. A recent report by The Australian National University estimates by 2050, "47% of Tuvaluan adults (4,900 people)...will want to migrate but [will] be unable to do so", with limiting factors being financial and available places on migration programs to other countries. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • A mother and child walk along a road in central Funafuti, Tuvalu. Located in the South West Pacific Ocean, Tuvalu is the world's 4th smallest country and is one of the most vulnerable to climate change impacts including sea level rise, drought and extreme weather events. Tuvalu - March, 2019.
  • A man purchases plants from a farm jointly run by the Tuvalu and Taiwanese governments. The farm is part of a program of assistance provided by Taiwan. Tuvalu has poor quality soil throughout its islands and atolls resulting in few vegetables and fruits being available for local to eat. The farm sells vegetables to locals twice a week. Located in the South West Pacific Ocean, Tuvalu is the world's 4th smallest country and is one of the most vulnerable to climate change impacts including sea level rise, drought and extreme weather events. Tuvalu - March, 2019.
  • Waves from the Pacific Ocean crash onto shore in Funafuti, Tuvalu. Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Waves from the Pacific Ocean crash onto shore in Funafuti, Tuvalu. Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Frank Fiapati, 30, plays with his youngest child outside their home in Funafuti, Tuvalu. Located in the South West Pacific Ocean, Tuvalu is the world's 4th smallest country and is one of the most vulnerable to climate change impacts including sea level rise, drought and extreme weather events. Tuvalu - March, 2019.
  • Coral appear under the waves near an island in the Funafuti atoll, Tuvalu. According to the UN, "Many coral species are highly vulnerable to heat stress. Scientists suggest that a 1 deg Celsius increase in average water temperature will cause coral reefs to die – a process know as coral bleaching. Tuvalu is experiencing a small amount of coral bleaching and this is expected to rise. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change predicts that in the next 30 to 50 years coral bleaching events will occur every year. With coral dying, Tuvalu will lose its fish stocks - a principle source of protein for island communities like Tuvalu." March, 2019.
  • As well as rising seas in Tuvalu, there are also other threats that lurk just offshore. In this image, South Korean fishing vessels refuel and restock as they pass by Tuvalu. The waters surounding Tuvalu are rich with marine life, but a steady stream of international fishing vessels pass through the country's waters daily, stripping sea life from the water by using bottom trawling nets which drag along the sea floor to collect fish. Other non-target species are often inevitably caught during this process. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • A woman collects cucumbers harvested from a farm jointly run by the Tuvalu and Taiwanese governments. The farm is part of a program of assistance provided by Taiwan. Tuvalu has poor quality soil throughout its islands and atolls resulting in few vegetables and fruits being available for local to eat. The farm sells vegetables to locals twice a week. Located in the South West Pacific Ocean, Tuvalu is the world's 4th smallest country and is one of the most vulnerable to climate change impacts including sea level rise, drought and extreme weather events. Tuvalu - March, 2019.
  • Waves from the Pacific Ocean crash onto shore in Funafuti, Tuvalu. Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • An aerial view of downtown Funafuti, the capital of Tuvalu. Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • A child on a bed in a fisherman's home in central Funafuti, Tuvalu. Located in the South West Pacific Ocean, Tuvalu is the world's 4th smallest country and is one of the most vulnerable to climate change impacts including sea level rise, drought and extreme weather events. Tuvalu - March, 2019.
  • A young boy puts his hands over his face near a dead fish on the shores of a beach in Funafuti. According to RNZ News in 2018, "The European Union has lifted a so-called "yellow card" it had given Tuvalu over its fisheries management. The lifting comes following improvements Tuvalu's made to fight illegal fishing. Tuvalu was issued the yellow card in December 2014, at risk of being considered a "non-cooperating country." Fish caught by vessels operating in these countries can't be imported into the EU. The European Commission said it recognised Tuvalu's progress in addressing shortcomings in its fisheries governance. It said the EU had been able to help Tuvalu combat illegal fishing through a range of measures. ." Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Waves from the Pacific Ocean crash onto shore in Funafuti, Tuvalu. Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Waves from the Pacific Ocean crash onto shore in Funafuti, Tuvalu. Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Enele Sopoaga, the Prime Minister of Tuvalu. Located in the South West Pacific Ocean, Tuvalu is the world's 4th smallest country and is one of the most vulnerable to climate change impacts including sea level rise, drought and extreme weather events. Tuvalu - March, 2019.
  • People play volleyball next to a flooded area near the airport runway, in downtown Funafuti. Parts of the island flood at this time of the year due to the 'king tides'. The king tides are seasonal and are characterised by very high water levels in the surrounding ocean. At this time of year the waves inundate the coastline but also water seeps up through the ground which is made of porous coral. This natural phenomenon is particularly serious for Tuvalu, a low-lying atoll island nation, whose highest point is only a few metres above sea level. As sea levels rise, the king tides regularly flood parts of the island and will likely increase in severity in the future, potentially making large parts of the nation uninhabitable. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
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