• Piles of discarded oyster shells lie on the beaches of Zhanjiang, Guangdong Province. Large scale over exploitation of seafood has damaged the mangroves of the region. Over the past century, the world has lost over 50% of its coastal mangroves. They have been cleared mainly to make way for commercial shrimp and fish farms. The unique trees which live in salt water are valued for the ability to protect shorelines and are home to a diverse array of flora and fauna. 2010
  • Piles of discarded oyster shells lie on the beaches of Zhanjiang, Guangdong Province. Large scale over exploitation of seafood has damaged the mangroves of the region. Over the past century, the world has lost over 50% of its coastal mangroves. They have been cleared mainly to make way for commercial shrimp and fish farms. The unique trees which live in salt water are valued for the ability to protect shorelines and are home to a diverse array of flora and fauna. 2010
  • Coastal developments for industry have contributed to the disappearance of magroves in Zhanjiang, Guangdong Province. Over the past century, the world has lost over 50% of its coastal mangroves. They have been cleared mainly to make way for commercial shrimp and fish farms. The unique trees which live in salt water are valued for the ability to protect shorelines and are home to a diverse array of flora and fauna. 2010
  • Major coastal developments have been one of the major causes of mangrove loss in Zhanjiang, Guangdong Province. Over the past century, the world has lost over 50% of its coastal mangroves. They have been cleared mainly to make way for commercial shrimp and fish farms. The unique trees which live in salt water are valued for the ability to protect shorelines and are home to a diverse array of flora and fauna. 2010
  • Inside the mangroves of Zhanjiang, Guangdong Province. Over the past century, the world has lost over 50% of its coastal mangroves. They have been cleared mainly to make way for commercial shrimp and fish farms. The unique trees which live in salt water are valued for the ability to protect shorelines and are home to a diverse array of flora and fauna. 2010
  • Inside the mangroves of Zhanjiang, Guangdong Province. Over the past century, the world has lost over 50% of its coastal mangroves. They have been cleared mainly to make way for commercial shrimp and fish farms. The unique trees which live in salt water are valued for the ability to protect shorelines and are home to a diverse array of flora and fauna. 2010
  • Mangroves of Zhanjiang, Guangdong Province. Over the past century, the world has lost over 50% of its coastal mangroves. They have been cleared mainly to make way for commercial shrimp and fish farms. The unique trees which live in salt water are valued for the ability to protect shorelines and are home to a diverse array of flora and fauna. 2010
  • Local residents take to the water to escape the summer heat in the city of Zhanjiang, Guangdong Province. 2010
  • As well as rising seas in Tuvalu, there are also other threats that lurk just offshore. In this image, South Korean fishing vessels refuel and restock as they pass by Tuvalu. The waters surounding Tuvalu are rich with marine life, but a steady stream of international fishing vessels pass through the country's waters daily, stripping sea life from the water by using bottom trawling nets which drag along the sea floor to collect fish. Other non-target species are often inevitably caught during this process. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Coastal shoreline view in Zhanjiang, Guangdong Province. 2010
  • North Korea. 2009
  • Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems.
  • Waves from the Pacific Ocean crash onto shore in Funafuti, Tuvalu. Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Waves from the Pacific Ocean crash onto shore in Funafuti, Tuvalu. Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • A land reclamation project in central Funafuti to provide new buildings for the local government. Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • East of Huanghua in Hebei province, old sluice gates and dams lie in ruins and are submerged by the encroaching sea water from Bohai Bay. This stretch of coastline has been highlighted as one of the most vulnerable in China and will be one of the first to feel the impacts of rising sea levels and increased storm surges.
  • East of Huanghua in Hebei province, old sluice gates and dams lie in ruins and are submerged by the encroaching sea water from Bohai Bay. This stretch of coastline has been highlighted as one of the most vulnerable in China and will be one of the first to feel the impacts of rising sea levels and increased storm surges.
  • Waves from Bohai Bay lap near the world's tallest Mazu Statue of the Chinese Sea Goddess, in the Tianjin Binhai Mazu Cultural Park. Much of the port area in Tianjin has been built on reclaimed land and has been highlighted as being particularly vulnerable to sea level rise and storm surges. China, 2019.
  • A sea wall protects Dongjiang port in Tianjin. The port has been built largely on reclaimed land and is now one of the busiest port cities in the world. It is protected predominantly by sea walls of various shapes and sizes which help shelter the coastline and the ships delivering goods in and out of northern China. 2019
  • An aerial view of Funafuti atoll, on approach to land at the country's sole airport. Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Waves from the Pacific Ocean crash onto shore in Funafuti, Tuvalu. Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Waves from the Pacific Ocean crash onto shore in Funafuti, Tuvalu. Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
  • Waves from the Pacific Ocean (left) crash onto shore in Funafuti, Tuvalu. Seen from above, it's easy to see why the Southwest Pacific country of Tuvalu has been identified as one of the world's most vulnerable nations to climate change. The country is made up of a collection of small islands and coral atolls, totalling only 27 square kilometres, scattered over 500,000 square kilometres of ocean. The highest point throughout the country is only 5 metres above sea level, resulting in special vulnerability to sea level rise. According to the Tuvaluan government, "since 1993, sea level near Tuvalu has risen about 5mm per year; this is larger than the global average." Other challenges face the country including drought, ocean acidification and waste problems. Funafuti, Tuvalu. March, 2019.
View: 24 | 500
Next