• Recently caught fish dry in the open air at the port in Jakarta.<br />
<br />
To license this image, please contact the National Geographic Creative Collection:<br />
<br />
Image ID: 1574979 <br />
 <br />
Email: natgeocreative@ngs.org<br />
<br />
Telephone: 202 857 7537 / Toll Free 800 434 2244<br />
<br />
National Geographic Creative<br />
1145 17th St NW, Washington DC 20036
  • A fish caught from Dongting Lake, Hunan Province. Dongting Lake has decreased in size in recent decades as a result of land reclamation and damming of the Yangtze. Fish stocks have also been depleted due to overfishing. China. 2010
  • Fish caught from Dongting Lake, Hunan Province. Dongting Lake has decreased in size in recent decades as a result of land reclamation and damming of the Yangtze. Fish stocks have also been depleted due to overfishing. China. 2010
  • A man handles a fish in Yueyang fish market near Dongting Lake, Hunan Province. Dongting Lake has decreased in size in recent decades as a result of land reclamation and damming of the Yangtze. China. 2010
  • A man handles a fish in Yueyang fish market near Dongting Lake, Hunan Province. Dongting Lake has decreased in size in recent decades as a result of land reclamation and damming of the Yangtze. China. 2010
  • A man handles a fish in Yueyang fish market near Dongting Lake, Hunan Province. Dongting Lake has decreased in size in recent decades as a result of land reclamation and damming of the Yangtze. China. 2010
  • A man handles a fish in Yueyang fish market near Dongting Lake, Hunan Province. Dongting Lake has decreased in size in recent decades as a result of land reclamation and damming of the Yangtze. China. 2010
  • A man handles a fish in Yueyang fish market near Dongting Lake, Hunan Province. Dongting Lake has decreased in size in recent decades as a result of land reclamation and damming of the Yangtze. China. 2010
  • Fish for sale at a market in central Jakarta.<br />
<br />
To license this image, please contact the National Geographic Creative Collection:<br />
<br />
Image ID: 1574962 <br />
 <br />
Email: natgeocreative@ngs.org<br />
<br />
Telephone: 202 857 7537 / Toll Free 800 434 2244<br />
<br />
National Geographic Creative<br />
1145 17th St NW, Washington DC 20036
  • Fish on sale in a market in central Kolkata.<br />
<br />
To license this image, please contact the National Geographic Creative Collection:<br />
<br />
Image ID: 1925710 <br />
 <br />
Email: natgeocreative@ngs.org<br />
<br />
Telephone: 202 857 7537 / Toll Free 800 434 2244<br />
<br />
National Geographic Creative<br />
1145 17th St NW, Washington DC 20036
  • A dead fish lies on the shore of the mangroves of Zhanjiang, Guangdong Province, washed up and deposited at high tide. Intense industrial development in the region has led to high levels of pollution. Over the past century, the world has lost over 50% of its coastal mangroves. They have been cleared mainly to make way for commercial shrimp and fish farms. The unique trees which live in salt water are valued for the ability to protect shorelines and are home to a diverse array of flora and fauna. 2010
  • A fish lies on the floor in Yueyang fish market near Dongting Lake, Hunan Province. Dongting Lake has decreased in size in recent decades as a result of land reclamation and damming of the Yangtze. China. 2010
  • A discarded fish on the shores of Dongting Lake, Hunan Province. Dongting Lake has decreased in size in recent decades as a result of land reclamation and damming of the Yangtze. Fish stocks ahve also been depleted in the lake China. 2010
  • A fish lies on the floor in Yueyang fish market near Dongting Lake, Hunan Province. Dongting Lake has decreased in size in recent decades as a result of land reclamation and damming of the Yangtze. China. 2010
  • Freshly caught fish piled on cracked soil in a mangrove forest in Jakarta.<br />
<br />
To license this image, please contact the National Geographic Creative Collection:<br />
<br />
Image ID: 1588075 <br />
 <br />
Email: natgeocreative@ngs.org<br />
<br />
Telephone: 202 857 7537 / Toll Free 800 434 2244<br />
<br />
National Geographic Creative<br />
1145 17th St NW, Washington DC 20036
  • Fish for sale in a market in a slum community in central Jakarta.<br />
<br />
To license this image, please contact the National Geographic Creative Collection:<br />
<br />
Image ID: 1588050 <br />
 <br />
Email: natgeocreative@ngs.org<br />
<br />
Telephone: 202 857 7537 / Toll Free 800 434 2244<br />
<br />
National Geographic Creative<br />
1145 17th St NW, Washington DC 20036
  • CHINA. Shanghai. Fish in the Shanghai Science and Technology Museum (?????; pinyin: Shàngh?i ke¯jì gu?n) is a large museum in Pudong, Shanghai, close to Century Park, the largest park of the city. The construction of the museum cost 1,75 billion RMB, and the floor area is 98 000m2 .2008..
  • Shrimp ponds in the city of Zhanjiang, in Guangdong Province. Over the past century, the world has lost over 50% of its coastal mangroves. They have been cleared mainly to make way for commercial shrimp and fish farms. The unique trees which live in salt water are valued for the ability to protect shorelines and are home to a diverse array of flora and fauna. 2010
  • A dead fish lies in one of the ponds at the Xixi wetlands which lie in the west of the city of Hangzhou. This is China's 'first national wetland park,' dubbed as such to act as a role model to all other wetlands in China and to supposedly show how to effectively manage and restore wetlands, notably urban wetlands. Zhejiang Province. China. 2010
  • Yueyang fish market near Dongting Lake, Hunan Province. Dongting Lake has decreased in size in recent decades as a result of land reclamation and damming of the Yangtze. China. 2010
  • Locals gut fish in the Zhalong Wetlands, Heilongjiang Province. China. 2011
  • Locals gut fish in the Zhalong Wetlands, Heilongjiang Province. China. 2011
  • Over-fishing to meet commercial demand has been one of the main causes of mangrove destruction in Zhanjiang, Guangdong Province. Over the past century, the world has lost over 50% of its coastal mangroves. They have been cleared mainly to make way for commercial shrimp and fish farms. The unique trees which live in salt water are valued for the ability to protect shorelines and are home to a diverse array of flora and fauna. 2010
  • Yueyang fish market near Dongting Lake, Hunan Province. Dongting Lake has decreased in size in recent decades as a result of land reclamation and damming of the Yangtze. China. 2010
View: 24 | All
Next