• Men carrying large baskets of food and good on their heads in the Kolay market in central Kolkata.<br />
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  • Men carrying large baskets on their heads in the Kolay market in central Kolkata.<br />
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  • A man carries piles of leather trimmings that are to be burnt and used as fertilizer.<br />
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  • A woman walks past a polluted lake near wetlands on the outskirts of Kolkata.<br />
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  • People carrying flower strings near the Howrah bridge on the banks of the Ganges River in Kolkata.<br />
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  • Chinese Alligator eggs (Alligator sinensis),  Anhui Research Center for Alligator Reproduction. Only 120 individuals remain in the wild in China as a result of wetlands reclamation. Xuancheng City, Anhui Province. China. 2010
  • A man selling fruit in the Kolay market in central Kolkata.<br />
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  • Chinese Alligator eggs (Alligator sinensis),  Anhui Research Center for Alligator Reproduction. Only 120 individuals remain in the wild in China as a result of wetlands reclamation. Xuancheng City, Anhui Province. China. 2010
  • Freshly caught mussels lie on the floor in the port area of Jakarta.<br />
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  • Freshly caught seafood in a market in the port area of Jakarta.<br />
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  • Piles of plastic sit in a informal recycling center in Kolkata.<br />
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  • People walk through the Kolay market in central Kolkata.<br />
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  • Piles of plastic sit in a informal recycling centre in Kolkata.<br />
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  • A man carries a large basket on his head across the Howrah bridge in central Kolkata.<br />
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  • Chiman Singh, 50, outside of his home in the village of Teejaruhela on the India-Pakistan border. Manjit suffers from severe arsenic and heavy metal poisoning. He is one of many in his village suffering from severe health issues believed to be caused by excessive pesticide use in the region over the past 30-40 years which has led to the accumulation of dangerous levels of toxins such as uranium, lead and mercury which are contributing to increased health problems in rural communities. It's a hidden epidemic which is gripping the Punjab region in northeast India which for decades has been the country's 'bread basket'. Local farmers and their families are now paying the price for the country's 'Green Revolution'.
  • Manjit Kaur, 9, sits alone in her classroom in the village of Teejaruhela on the India-Pakistan border. Manjit suffers from Down's Syndrome and is one of many children in the village who suffer from development health issues. Scientists believe that excessive pesticide use in the region over the past 30-40 years has led to the accumulation of dangerous levels of toxins such as uranium, lead and mercury which are contributing to increased health problems in rural communities. It's a hidden epidemic which is gripping the Punjab region in northeast India which for decades has been the country's 'bread basket'. Local farmers and their families are now paying the price for the country's 'Green Revolution'.
  • Shinda Singh (left) sits with his wife Jaswanda Kaur, in their bedroom in the village of Teejaruhela. They are one of many childless couples, as a result of infertility. It is believed that excessive pesticide use in the region over the past 30-40 years has led to the accumulation of dangerous levels of toxins such as uranium, lead and mercury which are contributing to increased health problems in rural communities. It's a hidden epidemic which is gripping the Punjab region in northeast India which for decades has been the country's 'bread basket'. Local farmers and their families are now paying the price for the country's 'Green Revolution'.
  • Navdeep Kaur (17) and Sandeep Kaur (13) hold a portrait of their late father, Daljit Singh, who died of tongue cancer in 2005, aged only 34. It is believed that excessive pesticide use in the region over the past 30-40 years has led to the accumulation of dangerous levels of toxins such as uranium, lead and mercury which are contributing to increased health problems including cancers, birth defects and mental disabilities in children. It's a hidden epidemic which is gripping the Punjab region in northeast India which for decades has been the country's 'bread basket'. As local farmers and their families continue to get ill they are paying the price for the country's 'Green Revolution'.
  • Daukhi Valmaki (50) holds a portrait of her late husband who died in 2007 from throat cancer, aged 60. It is believed that excessive pesticide use in the region over the past 30-40 years has led to the accumulation of dangerous levels of toxins such as uranium, lead and mercury which are contributing to increased health problems including cancers, birth defects and mental disabilities in children. It's a hidden epidemic which is gripping the Punjab region in northeast India which for decades has been the country's 'bread basket'. As local farmers and their families continue to get ill they are paying the price for the country's 'Green Revolution'.
  • Balkaur Singh (52) holds a portrait of his late mother Mukhtyar Kaur, who died in 2013 of breast and liver cancer, aged 75. It is believed that excessive pesticide use in the region over the past 30-40 years has led to the accumulation of dangerous levels of toxins such as uranium, lead and mercury which are contributing to increased health problems including cancers, birth defects and mental disabilities in children. It's a hidden epidemic which is gripping the Punjab region in northeast India which for decades has been the country's 'bread basket'. As local farmers and their families continue to get ill they are paying the price for the country's 'Green Revolution'.
  • Sukhbeer Kaur (19) holds a portrait of her father, Pippal Singh, who died in 2010 of cancer, aged 40. It is believed that excessive pesticide use in the region over the past 30-40 years has led to the accumulation of dangerous levels of toxins such as uranium, lead and mercury which are contributing to increased health problems including cancers, birth defects and mental disabilities in children. It's a hidden epidemic which is gripping the Punjab region in northeast India which for decades has been the country's 'bread basket'. As local farmers and their families continue to get ill they are paying the price for the country's 'Green Revolution'.
  • Sukpal Kaur, holds a portrait of her late husband who died as a result of contracting Hepatitis C. It is believed that excessive pesticide use in the region over the past 30-40 years has led to the accumulation of dangerous levels of toxins such as uranium, lead and mercury which are contributing to increased health problems in rural communities. It's a hidden epidemic which is gripping the Punjab region in northeast India which for decades has been the country's 'bread basket'. As local farmers and their families continue to get ill they are paying the price for the country's 'Green Revolution'.
  • A man walks through a small Chinese village while carrying a basket.
  • Chand Singh, 10, sits outside his home in the village of Teejaruhela. He has suffered from spastic cerebral palsy since birth. It is believed that excessive pesticide use in the region over the past 30-40 years has led to the accumulation of dangerous levels of toxins such as uranium, lead and mercury which are contributing to increased health problems in rural communities. It's a hidden epidemic which is gripping the Punjab region in northeast India which for decades has been the country's 'bread basket'. Local farmers and their families are now paying the price for the country's 'Green Revolution'.
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